GT350H

1966 Shelby GT350H Fastback

Offered by Mecum | Harrisburg, Pennsylvania | August 3-5, 2017

Photo – Mecum

Hertz is a company that has been involved with automobiles since 1923. At one point they were part of the Yellow Coach company, a manufacturer of buses that eventually became part of GM. In the 1960s, Shelby built a run of special cars for the rental car agency: the GT350H.

The GT350 is powered by a 4.7-liter V-8 that was modified by Shelby to put out 306 horsepower. The Hertz cars were almost all painted black with gold stripes. Dubbed “Rent-a-Racer,” the GT350H could be picked up at your local Hertz counter – if you were a member of their Sports Car Club.

Back in the day, people rented these and entered them in SCCA events. The fun legend is that some would be returned to Hertz with remnants of a welded-in roll cage. There were 999 of these built – and those that hadn’t been totaled in racing accidents (it had to have happened at least once) were returned to Ford after a specified amount of time. Ford removed any go-fast parts aspiring race car drivers may have installed and then flipped the cars onto the public market.

Imagine something like this today. It would never happen. It’s like if you could roll up to Avis and request a new Dodge Demon to take to the drag strip. Society, as litigious as it has become, would never allow for it. This is a piece of motoring history because it is a product of its time. And because of that, it is really, really cool. This well documented, well presented example can be yours. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $120,000.

The Machine

1970 AMC Rebel Machine

Offered by Mecum | Denver, Colorado | July 20-22, 2017

Photo – Mecum

AMC, whose history is long, tangled, and very interesting (but we won’t go into it here), seemed to build two kinds of cars during the course of their existence: 1. absolute garbage or 2. kind of cool, fast, sporty muscle cars. Even within the Rebel line, which was built between 1967 and 1970, it was a 50/50 split (though in 1967 it was technically not an AMC, but a Rambler… before that marque was merged back into the AMC line).

1970 was the final year for the Rebel and it could be had as a sedan or a two-door hardtop coupe. The base engine was a straight-six and a range of V-8s were offered as well. They also built a top-of-the-line muscle car and they called it “The Machine,” which is a pretty badass, if not lofty, name for a car.

The Machine is powered by a 6.4-liter V-8 making 340 horsepower. That was a decent enough rating, but it was still well short of what the big motors from Ford, GM, and Chrysler were making in 1970. This example is well-optioned and looks very nice. It’s one of 1,000 painted in the iconic red, white, and blue paint scheme – out of a total of 2,326 Rebel Machines built. This is one of the coolest cars AMC ever built and it can be yours! Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum in Denver.

Update: Sold $50,000.

Five Rare Mopars

Five Rare Mopars

Offered by Mecum | Kissimmee, Florida | January 6-15, 2017


1962 Dodge Dart 330 Max Wedge

Photo – Mecum

The second-generation of the Dodge Dart was downsized from a full-size car to a mid-size car. This generation was only built for 1962 before moving to a compact platform in 1963. Three trim levels were available: the base Dart, the mid-trim Dart 330, and the top-trim Dart 440.

1962 also happened to be the year that Chrysler released an engine dubbed the Max Wedge – a 6.8-liter V-8 making 410 horsepower. It was designed to make their cars monsters at the drag strip and in the early 1960s, American automakers were perfectly happy to build low-volume versions of their high-volume family cars to dominate the ¼-mile.

This two-door sedan – likely the only body style you could get this engine – has been fully restored and is an authentic Max Wedge car. Production numbers are hard to come by, but about 25,500 ’62 Dart 330s were built (total of all five body styles) and there were approximately 13,500 Two-Door Sedans built across all Dart trim levels. The closest estimate I have to the number of Max Wedge Darts is 210. This one should bring between $85,000-$110,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.


1963 Dodge 330 Max Wedge

Photo – Mecum

The “330” was a trim line introduced by Dodge in 1962 and in 1963, they separated it off and it became its own model. Between 1963 and 1964 it was a full size Dodge before it was replaced by the Dodge 880 for 1965.

1963 was a good year for the Max Wedge as it was virtually unbeatable at the drag strip. The 7.0-liter V-8 put out 425 horsepower and was geared to go a quarter of mile at a time. This example has been beautifully restored and it is one of about 64,100 330s built in 1963. Of those, only 162 were fitted with this engine and this one should bring between $90,000-$120,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum.

Update: Sold $70,000.


1963 Dodge Polara 500 Max Wedge

Photo – Mecum

The Dodge Polara was a full-size Dodge and the second generation of the car was built between 1962 and 1964. For 1963, the Polara was available in two trim levels, the base Polara and the performance model dubbed the “500.” The Polara was essentially the same as the ’63 Dodge 440 except that it had backup lights. The 500 trim level added a base V-8, bucket seats and more interior niceties.

So what we have here is a 7.0-liter, 425 horsepower V-8 shoehorned into a well-appointed luxury two-door sedan. It was built as a customer order and never raced. It shows 36,000 miles and is one of about 39,800 Polaras produced in 1963. Of those, about 7,300 were Polara 500s and only five of those have the Max Wedge engine. This rarity will bring between $85,000-$115,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.


1964 Dodge 440 Max Wedge Lightweight

Photo – Mecum

The 440 was a trim-line on the 1962 Dodge Dart and for 1963 and 1964 it became its own full-size Dodge. Five body styles were offered and this two-door hardtop coupe will actually seat six. It was a step up from the Dodge 330 but a step below the Dodge Polara.

The engine is a 425 horsepower, 7.0-liter Max Wedge V-8 and it’s also a factory Lightweight. It’s had unnecessary weight stripped out and lightweight panels added where appropriate. Coupled with the big engine, this was a drag strip beast. It’s one of only 10 such cars built and should bring between $200,000-$250,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $140,000.


1964 Plymouth Belvedere Max Wedge Lightweight

Photo – Mecum

The fifth generation Plymouth Belvedere was built between 1962 and 1964. For this generation the car got smaller and slotted in between the Savoy and the Fury. Offered in five body styles, this two-door hardtop could be had with a slew of engine choices.

But this example has a 7.0-liter Max Wedge V-8 making 425 horsepower. It was the final year for the Max Wedge engine before the “Hemi” made its debut. It’s a factory lightweight, so it has aluminium body panels in places. Fully restored to its correct color, this is one of just 14 Max Wedge Lightweights produced for the 1964 Belvedere. In all, 16,334 hardtop Belvederes were made in 1964. This one should bring between $125,000-$150,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum.

Update: Sold $140,000.

Hemi Challenger Convertible

1970 Dodge Challenger R/T Hemi Convertible

Offered by Mecum | Kissimmee, Florida | January 15-24, 2016

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

Rare Hemi week continues with this, Dodge’s bad-boy muscle car from 1970. The original Challenger model was produced between the 1970 and 1974 model years only. The 1970 model is the most collectible, followed by the ’71s.

What 1970 had and the other years didn’t was a Convertible. The R/T performance package was also available (it included beefy brakes, etc.). Only 1,070 R/T Convertibles were sold in 1970. Guess what, the Hemi makes it even rarer. Long the Holy Grail of muscle cars, the 1970 Hemi ‘Cuda Convertible had 14 built. Only nine Hemi Challenger Convertibles were ever made. Of those nine, this is one of four cars equipped with an automatic transmission.

The 425 horsepower, 7.0-liter “426 Hemi” V-8 is a numbers matching example on this low-mileage, restored car. In fact, it has covered less than 1,500 miles since the restoration was completed. It’s must-have muscle if you’re in that game. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum.

Update: Sold $1,650,000.

’68 Hemi Charger

1968 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi

Offered by Russo & Steele | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 27-31, 2016

Photo - Russo & Steele

Photo – Russo & Steele

There’s three generations of classic Hemi Dodge Chargers that are really collectible. First is the 1966-1967 model. Then came this one. And finally, the 1971-1974 model. This is the most famous body style of the original Dodge Chargers. It is the one that Bo and Luke Duke tore around in.

This is a Hemi, meaning it is powered by a 7.0-liter V-8 rated at 425 horsepower. This is also an R/T car, meaning is has the “road and track package” which adds dual exhaust and heavy duty brakes, among other things (including the standard 440 engine or the optional Hemi).

This car has a rare 4-speed transmission and is the only such example with this color paint, which is actually quite nice. It’s been exceptionally restored. Only 467 1968 Chargers were equipped with the 426 Hemi and this is one of the nicest. Click here for more info and here for more from Russo & Steele.

Update: Sold $242,000.

’70 Hemi Cuda Convertible

1970 Plymouth Hemi ‘Cuda Convertible

Offered by Mecum | Kissimmee, Florida | January 15-24, 2016

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

The 1970-1971 Plymouth ‘Cudas are the best muscle cars. Yeah, that’s sort of a sweeping statement (and entirely opinion)… but it’s true. We’ve featured a 1970 Hemi ‘Cuda and a ’71 Hemi ‘Cuda Convertible (and a ’70 ‘Cuda Convertible that is supposed to look like a Hemi), but never a ’70 Hemi ‘Cuda Convertible. Which is what this car is.

Hemi ‘Cuda Convertibles are among the rarest of muscle cars: only 11 were built in 1971 and only 14 were built in 1970. That Hemi is a 7.0-liter V-8 rated at 425 horsepower. This car is one of five (of the 14) equipped with a four-speed manual transmission. On top of that, this car is loaded with options and was sold new in British Columbia.

It came back to the U.S. in 1999 and was restored. It’s covered a little over 27,000 miles in its life. Offered in factory-correct Lemon Twist paint, this car will easily break the million dollar mark. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum in Florida.

Update: Sold $2,675,000.

February 2015 Auction Highlights

The first auction we’re covering in our February rundown is actually Mecum’s Kissimmee sale held in January. Our featured 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona (with a Hemi) was the top sale for $900,000. On the other end of the spectrum, another of our feature cars, the International Scout, sold for $14,750. There were a lot of interesting cars, but we’ll call out this sweet 1971 Dodge Super Bee Hemi that brought $190,000.

Photo - Mecum Auctions

Photo – Mecum Auctions

Our featured highly-optioned ’71 Charger R/T Hemi failed to sell. Check out full results here.

And we’ll jump back to the first major sale of the year, Coys’ same-day doubleheader. We featured three cars from their sale in the Netherlands, with the 1956 Gaz 12 blowing it’s pre-sale estimate out of the water, more than quadrupling the low end of its estimate by selling for $107,890. The 1986 ZiL 115 brought $97,890. And the Cadillac Model B went for $54,440. Check out full results here.

Next up we have Bonhams’ sale in Paris where this 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Cabriolet was the top sale at $2,172,068.

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Of our feature cars, a few failed to sell: the Renault 40CV, Excelsior, Alfa Romeo RL, and the Alfa Romeo Pescara. The Borgward Rennsport brought $256,698 and the Isotta 8A SS sold for $1,066,288. Check out full results here.

Artcurial’s Paris sale featured the fascinating Baillon Collection of barn find French classics. There were some Italians in there too, and this buried-under-newspapers, garage fresh 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder sold for a world record $21,980,656.

1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder

Photo – Artcurial

Of our feature cars, the Croizemarie and the Renault Coupe-Chauffeur failed to sell. The Gregoire brought $152,817 while the Fouillaron Type G brought $120,645. The Footwork F1 car sold for $209,119. And the Bugatti Profile Aerodynamique went for $450,409. This sale had some pretty incredible results for some of the barn find cars. Check out full results here.

And finally, from Paris, RM’s auction where one of the best Ferraris ever was the top sale. This 1963 Ferrari 250 GT Lusso sold for $1,859,480.

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

We featured a pair of cars that RM had left over (or, more appropriately, held onto until they had the perfect venue) from the John Moir collection: the Lancia Belna and Voisin C3. Strangely, they both brought the same amount: $243,656.

Another Lancia we featured, an 037 Stradale, sold for $384,720. The Honeymoon Express Bentley went for $769,440 and the Iso Grifo Stradale brought $1,186,220. Check out full results here.

’71 Hemi Charger

1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi

Offered by Mecum | Kissimmee, Florida | January 23, 2015

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

This Charger is from the first year of production of the third generation body style, which would be built through 1974. It was the last “real” two-door Charger that wasn’t badge-engineered and that was a capable of anything resembling performance.

What makes this car even better is that it has a Hemi. 1971 was the final year for the 426 Hemi – the 425 horsepower 7.0-liter monster V-8. This is the highest-optioned Charger known to exist from this year – it is one of very few cars with a powered sunroof and is one of only 63 built in ’71 with a Hemi.

The original base price of a 1971 Charger was almost doubled when the finally option tally was finished. The High Impact Hemi Orange is set off by the R/T package of graphics. The car is correct and has 35,638 original miles on it. It has everything and Mecum actually has an estimate on it: $450,000-$550,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $375,000.

Hemi Charger Daytona

1969 Dodge Charger Daytona Hemi

Offered by Mecum | Kissimmee, Florida | January 16-25, 2015

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

Chrysler was serious about NASCAR at the end of the 1960s. They were designing purpose-built specials to compete in NASCAR and win on the big ovals of Daytona and Talladega. The Plymouth Superbird would come in 1970, but for ’69 there was the Charger Daytona, which was a modified Dodge Charger (specifically, the Charger 500 model).

The changes were mostly aerodynamic: a pointed nose cone that was attached at the front to cut through the air and a 23-inch mega-spoiler out back. There were smaller trim bits as well and the standard engine was the 440 V-8. But this example has the Hemi option – a 425 horsepower 7.0-liter V-8.

Only 503 Charger Daytonas were built and only 70 have a Hemi. This is the lowest-mileage Hemi Daytona known to exist, having only 6,435 original miles and was once part of the Otis Chandler Collection. It is an easy six-figure car. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum in Kissimmee next January.

Update: Sold $900,000.

Mercury Comet 202

1967 Mercury Comet 202 R-Code Sedan

Offered by Mecum | Austin, Texas | December 13, 2014

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

The Mercury Comet began in 1960 as Mercury’s compact model. It was originally going to be an Edsel model, but the Edsel marque was killed off before it ever had the chance to exist. In fact, for the first two years, they weren’t even branded as Mercurys… just “Comet”s.

The third generation Comet was built in 1966 and 1967 and was actually bumped up to Ford’s mid-size Fairlane chassis. Actually, for 1967, the Comet sub-models became their own models (the Capri, Cyclone, Caliente, etc.) and the only Comet-badged cars were the base Comet 202, which was available as a two (as seen here) or four-door sedan.

This car is actually one of only 22 Comets to receive the R-Code 7.0-liter V-8 making 425 horsepower. Only six are known to still exist. This thing is a true sleeper. It is also in excellent, unrestored condition having covered only 2,004 miles in its lifetime. It can be yours now. Check out Mecum’s site for more info and click here for more from Mecum in Austin.

Update: Sold $169,000.