Marcos TS500

2003 Marcos TS500

Offered by Coys | Fontwell House, U.K. | July 12, 2018

Photo – Coys

Marcos Engineering lasted quite a while, from 1959 through 2007. Over the course of that time, they made a number of different models in varying quantities and each successive car looked like an evolution of the design before it (with one major exception). For example, compare the overall look of this TS500 to 1970’s Marcos 3-Litre.

The TS500 was an updated version of the company’s Marcasite TS250. Instead of a 2.5-liter V-6, the TS500 features a 320 horsepower, 5.0-liter Rover V-8. Sixty mph arrived in about four seconds and the car tops out around 160 mph.

Only a handful of these were made before Marcos switched up production to focus on the TSO before ultimately going out of business. This car was the original factory prototype and press car. It’s a 15,000 mile car with service records. A rare treat from a lost British sports car manufacturer, this convertible should bring between $33,000-$40,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Bristol Blenheim 3

2000 Bristol Blenheim 3

Offered by Coys | Woodstock, U.K. | June 30, 2018

Photo – Coys

The Bristol 411 was produced from 1969 through 1976 when it was replaced by the 603. The 603 was a pretty big departure, styling-wise from earlier models. It was more modern and less “classically British.” Somehow Bristol managed to continue building the 603 from 1976 through 2011, which is pretty incredible.

After a few different name changes as the model was refined, the Blenheim name was introduced in 1995. It would be produced in three different series until 2011. The Blenheim 3, as we have here, first went on sale in 2000. It featured an upgraded interior and different tail lights. Oh yeah, and the engine got an upgrade. It’s got a 360 horsepower, 5.9-liter Chrysler V-8.

Bristol is one of the most secretive automotive marques in the world. They didn’t even officially publish a horsepower figure. With such exclusive clientele, they certainly won’t tell us how many examples of the Blenheim (of any sort) have been made. This 51,000 mile example should bring between $60,000-$65,000. Click here for more info and here for the rest of Coys’ lineup.

Miura P400

1967 Lamborghini Miura P400

Offered by Coys | Monaco | May 11, 2018

Photo – Coys

The Lamborghini Miura is largely considered to be the first supercar. And rightfully so as it checks most of the supercar boxes: outlandish, racy looks (check!); unreal speed (it was the world’s fastest car upon introduction… so… check!); a mid-engined layout with a V-12 (check!) and a very exotic name (check!).

Miuras were built between 1966 and 1973 and the first model offered was the P400. Produced between 1966 and 1969, when it was replaced by the P400 S, the base P400 is powered by a 4.0-liter V-12 producing 350 horsepower. These cars were capable of about 170 mph, making them quicker than anything else on the road at the time.

This example, one of just 275 produced, was sold new to a rich Texan via Lambo’s London dealership. He kept the car until 1987 when he donated it to a museum in San Antonio. From there, it was purchased by a German owner in 1994. Another German had it until it was purchased by its current owner in 1999. A rare, well-maintained survivor, this 26,000 mile car will likely break the bank if it finds a new owner this weekend in Monaco. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Noble M12 GTO-3

2003 Noble M12 GTO-3

Offered by Coys | London, U.K. | February 17, 2018

Photo – Coys

I have a soft spot for the Noble M12. The U.S. distributor (or one of them) was located not far from where I grew up and I saw them a lot when I was younger. This is the GTO-3 – the mid-range model, introduced in 2002, two years after the original 2.5 version.

The “3” signifies that it is powered by a twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter Ford V-6 making 352 horsepower. It could hit 60 mph in under four seconds and topped out at 170 mph. It was a decent power bump over the 2.5-liter model and it had enough performance improvement to justify the increased cost.

It is thought that only 116 examples of this model were produced (there was also an even more hardcore GTO-3R). The M12 has been molded into other cars after Noble stopped producing them, but this is an actual Noble from 2003. It is expected to sell for between $45,000-$53,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Ferrari 208 GTS Turbo

1985 Ferrari 208 GTS Turbo

Offered by Coys | Birmingham, U.K. | January 13, 2018

Photo – Coys

Let’s start with what we know: this looks like a Ferrari 308. Yes it does; the Ferrari 308 was a popular model in the 1980s and was, until very recently, a very affordable exotic, with prices dipping into the low $30k range about 10 years ago.

Because of the tax structure in Italy in 1980, Ferrari decided to build a 2.0-liter variant of the 308 for their home market (and for a few export markets as well). The 1980-1981 208 GTB/GTS was a very low-production model. In 1982, they strapped a turbocharger to it and the 208 GTB/GTS Turbo was born. These were available through 1985.

Powered by a turbocharged 2.0-liter V-8 making 217 horsepower, this was Ferrari’s first turbocharged road car. And it was a significant horsepower bump over the naturally-aspirated 208. In 1983, they brought out the targa version you see here. By 1985, this car was on the opposite end of the Ferrari spectrum from the 288 GTO.

Only 250 208 GTS Turbos were built, making it much rarer than it’s 308 cousin, which it shared nearly everything else besides the engine. This example was sold new in Malta and has been with the consignor for 17 years. It looks flawless and it you want something that looks “ordinary” (for a Ferrari) but is something actually much weirder rarer, then this is the car for you. It should bring between $53,500-$67,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Alfa Romeo GTC

1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC

Offered by Coys | London, U.K. | December 5, 2017

Photo – Coys

Shortly before the Giulietta went out of production, Alfa Romeo introduced the Giulia Sprint GT (in 1963), which was based on a shortened version of the Giulia sedan’s chassis. It, and later cars like the GTV, would be hugely successful and are sought after by those in the know today.

First shown in 1965, the Giulia GTC was a convertible version of the Sprint GT. The convertible conversion was handled by Carrozzeria Touring and the result is fantastic. The coupes are great looking cars in their own right, but who doesn’t want a little sun? The GTC is powered by a 1.6-liter straight-four making 105 horsepower.

Only about 1,000 of these were built in three years (there were about 100 assembled at the end of 1964). This is one of 45 right-hand-drive examples built in 1966 and one of just 292 GTCs built in 1966 total. This one has been restored at a decent cost and should bring between $130,000-$175,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Coys in December.

October 2017 Auction Highlights

Welcome to October, though we’re starting in September with Mecum’s Louisville sale. We didn’t get to feature anything from this one, but this 1968 Shelby GT500 was the top sale, bringing $90,500. Click here to see what else sold.

Photo – Mecum

Onward to Bonhams’ sale at the Simeone Foundation in Philadelphia. This is always a good one, and their top sale here was $1,001,000 paid for this 1913 Rolls-Royce 40/50HP Silver Ghost London-to-Edinburgh Sports Tourer by Reuters.

Photo – Bonhams

We featured a number of cars from this sale and some of those failed to sell, including this Stearns-Knight, the Mobile Steam car, and a previously-featured Humber. The Stoddard-Dayton Raceabout sold for $106,700 and the 1917 Mack C-Cab truck was a steal at $8,800 (because that’s probably about what the paint on it cost). Click here for everything else.

RM Sotheby’s was also in Pennsylvania in October, in Hershey to be exact. Sadly the most interesting car of the entire auction, the Gasmobile, was withdrawn (as was the Derby). The top sale was this 1933 Pierce-Arrow Silver Arrow for $2,310,000.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Some big dollar feature cars included the Belgian-bodied Duesenberg for $1,485,000, the other Duesenberg for $549,000, the White Yellowstone Bus for $165,000, and the Stearns-Knight Touring for $132,000.

Other feature cars that sold included a pair of Stanleys, with the older one bringing $55,000 and the newer one $36,300. The Moon Roadster sold for $66,000. The Apperson Touring sold for $24,750 and the Sears Motor Buggy $35,200. Click here for complete results.

How about some results from Coys? This 1926 Bugatti Type 37 was the top seller at their Blenheim Palace sale back in July. It brought about $968,950. We didn’t feature anything from this sale but you can see more from it here.

Photo – Coys

Finally, Motostalgia’s McPherson Collection sale in Texas. We featured a Zimmer Quicksilver that ended up selling for $15,400. The top sale was this 1958 Facel Vega FVS Series 4 for $190,000. Click here for complete results.

Photo – Motostalgia

Adler Trumpf Junior

1935 Adler Trumpf Junior

Offered by Coys | Berlin, Germany | October 7, 2017

Photo – Coys

Adler was a German automobile manufacturer that got its start in 1900. Based in Frankfurt, the company introduced a pair of front-wheel drive models during the 1930s. They were the Trumpf and the smaller Trumpf Junior.

Introduced in 1934, this Junior model is powered by a 1.0-liter straight-four that makes 25 horsepower – enough to push the car to 56 mph. It was a popular model that performed and sold well.

Unfortunately for Adler, WWII came and their factory was destroyed by Allied bombs. Production did not resume after the war ended (though Adler did join with Triumph to build some motorcycles through the 1950s). This example was restored in 1992 and has been on museum duty since 2000. It should sell for between $14,000-$21,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Sauber C9

1989 Sauber-Mercedes C9

Offered by Coys | Fontwell, U.K. | September 7, 2017

Photo – Coys

Coys has a serious race car for it’s Goodwood sale this year. The Sauber C9 was one of the preeminent Group C race cars from the late 1980s. Introduced in 1987, it was developed from the Sauber C8 race car and was much more successful than it’s predecessor.

Co-designed by Peter Sauber, the C9 is powered by a 5.0-liter Mercedes-Benz V-8 with two turbochargers. That combination made 700 horsepower in the most basic of forms and over 900 if you cranked up the boost. The most famous C9s were those painted solid silver that won the 24 Hours of Le Mans on their way to the World Endurance Championship in 1989 (and they won the Championship again in 1990). This car is the only C9 that still wears the 1988 AEG livery – it was retained by Sauber for display in his museum after the 1988 season.

I do not have access to any race records for this particular chassis (C9-A2). The current owner purchased this car from Peter Sauber in 2010 – after 20 years of museum duty. It was restored in 2015 and a fresh engine was constructed by the original engine builder. No pre-sale estimate is available but you can see more here and more from Coys here.

Update: Sold, approximately $2,377,000.

Fiat 750 Vignale

1963 Fiat 750 Vignale Coupe

Offered by Coys | London, England | May 18, 2017

Photo – Coys

Fiat never built a car called the “750” but they did build one called the 600. Produced from 1955 through 1969, it was visually similar to the classic 500, but with a larger engine. There was also the van-like Multipla version, which was the basis for some wild designs. The normal 600 was also used as the basis for some cool coachbuilt cars. Fun fact, there was a version of the 600 called the “750” – but it was only produced by Zastava in Yugoslavia.

Vignale took the sort of tiny, round 600 and enlarged the engine to 750cc. In this guise, the straight-four probably made more power than the original 633cc engine. The body is the star here, though. It’s very stylish, sort of a mini-coupe that doesn’t resemble the base car at all. Vignale also built a two-door sedan and a convertible.

As far as production numbers go, there may have been as many as 40,000 750 Vignales built. That seems like quite a few, but then again Fiat built 2,695,197 600s in total, so it’s kind of a drop in the bucket. This one shows nice and it is completely usable. It should bring between $13,000-$15,500. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.