DB AR1

2003 Aston Martin DB AR1 Roadster by Zagato

Offered by Bonhams | Knokke-Heist, Belgium | October 6, 2017

Photo – Bonhams

The Aston Martin DB7 went on sale in 1994 with a straight-six engine. The V-12 arrived in 1999. By 2003, when the variant you see above was introduced, the DB7 was pretty long-in-the-tooth. Before this, there was a DB7 Zagato Coupe built from 2002 and 2003 that helped spice up the range. This is essentially the roadster version of that car.

And it’s a true roadster – there is no top. And I guess, technically, it’s not even a DB7 at all, since that “7” doesn’t appear in the car’s name. “AR1” stands for “American Roadster 1” and just 99 examples were produced. This is #23.

The DB AR1 is powered by a slightly tweaked version of the DB7 Vantage’s 6.0-liter V-12 that, in this car, makes 435 horsepower. All that power helped set a record of sorts – this is the world’s fastest true roadster, with a top speed of 186 mph.

The first owner of this car was American. Then it made it’s way to it’s third owner in Luxembourg by way of its second owner in Switzerland. It’s a 2,000 mile car and a gorgeous one at that. Aston and Zagato go hand in hand and this car is drivable proof. It is expected to sell for between $300,000-$420,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Bentley Woodie Wagon

2003 Bentley Arnage T 4WD Station Wagon by Pininfarina & Genaddi Design

Offered by Artcurial | Monaco | July 2, 2017

Photo – Artcurial

The Bentley Arnage, Bentley’s big sedan that they built from 1998 to 2009, was, and still is, a great-looking car. It was a front-engine, rear-wheel drive, four-door sedan. But what happens when your giant luxo-barge doesn’t have enough room from the groceries, the dog, and a sheet of plywood? Well you go spend $900,000 at a few posh design shops and transform that big British boat into a wagon. And then you put wood paneling on the side, Ford Country Squire-style.

I love it when people with too much money don’t know what to spend it on so they build a ridiculous car (pro-tip, you can always just send that spare change my way). The Arnage T was introduced in 2002 and is powered by a 459 horsepower, twin-turbocharged 6.8-liter V-8. Top speed was 170 mph and 60 arrived in 5.5 seconds. Pretty stout for a 15-year old sedan weighing over 5,000 pounds.

This one owner car was sent to Genaddi Design in the U.S. to be turned into a wagon, something Bentley didn’t build. He also needed it converted to four-wheel drive because this was to be his exclusive transport at his house in the Alpine village of St. Moritz, Switzerland. The 4WD system has a Cadillac Escalade to thank for its engineering (and some parts).

When completed it was shipped to the owners home in Monaco, but they weren’t happy and sent it to Pininfarina to add some final touches (and re-do the interior). This is the kind of car that draws strong opinions one way or the other and for the record, as big fans of wagons and the Arnage, we love it. If you’re the kind of person who needs his or her Bentley to be rarer than your neighbors Bentley, then here’s your ride. It should bring between $90,000-$180,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

DB7 Zagato

2003 Aston Martin DB7 Vantage Zagato

Offered by Bonhams | London, U.K. | December 4, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

While the Aston Martin DB7 may be one of the most beautiful cars ever put into production, that doesn’t stop people from trying to improve upon it. Enter Aston Martin collaborators, Zagato. They hadn’t touched an Aston since the 1960s and they chose the DB7 as their next canvas.

The first thing they did was shorten the chassis. Then Zagato crafted a muscular and sporty body to wrap around it – including a double-bubble roof, Zagato’s signature styling touch. Power from the 6.0-liter V-12 was increased to 440 horsepower. Top speed is 186 mph, although this example probably never got there as it’s covered less than 600 miles since new.

Only 99 of these coupes were produced between 2002 and 2003. This one was sold to Latvia and is now up for sale. These tend to come up for sale less than the DB AR1, Zagato’s equally rare followup Aston. This car is expected to bring between $300,000-$350,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Bonhams.

Update: Sold $390,262.

Saleen S7

2003 Saleen S7

Offered by Barrett-Jackson | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 30, 2016

Photo - Barrett-Jackson

Photo – Barrett-Jackson

The Saleen S7 was America’s home-grown supercar that debuted in 2000 and was built up through 2006 (for the base model. There was a Twin Turbo built from 2005 through 2009). Steve Saleen made his name tuning Mustangs and turned to building his own supercar at the end of the supercar-crazy 1990s. This thing definitely looks the part.

The powerplant is a mid-mounted 7.0-liter Ford V-8. This car is equipped with the “Competition Package” – one of four such naturally aspirated cars. In this trim, the engine puts out 625 horsepower (75 more than stock).

The auction catalog states that only 78 of these were built but it isn’t clear if that number represents all S7 production, or just the naturally aspirated cars. At any rate, they are rare (but they do come up for sale here and there). When new, the Twin Turbos cost over a half million dollars. This car should go for somewhere in the $300,000 range. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $451,000.

The Nautilus

2003 Nautilus

Offered by Coys | Blenheim Palace, U.K. | July 11, 2015

Photo - Coys

Photo – Coys

This isn’t our normal cup of tea, over-the-top movie cars without any real historical significance. But this ting is actually so crazy looking that it caught our attention. And, it runs and drives.

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is a superhero movie from 2003 starring Sean Connery that I will admit to having watched but have no recollection of whatsoever. The characters in the film are actually pretty interesting, ranging from Dorian Gray to Tom Sawyer to Captain Nemo. Nemo, of course, being from 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, and captain of the Nautilus submarine.

Well this Nautilus was his road car. It is actually based on an old Land Rover fire tender and uses a Rover V-8. The front four wheels steer and it has four doors and no roof. It is ludicrously lengthy and was used in the film. Two were built but one was mounted with cameras for interior shots while this was used for distance. It does run and drive but is definitely not street legal. It is, however, quite decorative and interesting. It is estimated to bring between $23,500-$40,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $49,411.

A Pair of T-Bird Concepts

Ford Thunderbird Concepts

Offered by RM Auctions | Farmer’s Branch, Texas | November 15, 2014


 2001 Ford Thunderbird Sports Roadster Concept

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

Ah, the retro styling craze of the early 2000s. Ford decided to bring back the Thunderbird for the 2002 model year. The car’s introduction was preceded by a slew of concept cars, including this Sports Roadster.

These Thunderbirds had soft tops or removable hard tops. This car is topless and has a fiberglass tonneau cover that fits nicely against the back of the head rests. You could’ve gotten a similar look on a 1960s T-Bird.

The engine is a standard 280 horsepower 3.9-liter V-8. This car was acquired from Ford by Sam Pack in 2010. It’s the only one like it and should sell for between $60,000-$80,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $55,000.


 2003 Ford Thunderbird Supercharged Concept

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

The Ford Thunderbird F-Code from 1957 was a mean, powerful machine. This car was meant to be the spiritual successor to that car. Ford never put it into production. But they should have. The last Thunderbird was a dud and perhaps a hot rod version would have helped.

The engine is a supercharged 3.9-liter V-8 making 390 horsepower. That’s sports car territory. It has a vented hood and other minor details to set it apart. This car was also acquired by Sam Pack from Ford in 2010. It should sell for between $50,000-$80,000. Click here for more info and here for the rest of the sale of the Sam Pack Collection.

Update: Sold $57,750.

One of the last AC cars

2003 AC Ace Brooklands

Offered by H&H Auctions | Rockingham Castle, U.K. | June 15, 2013

2003 AC Ace Brooklands

The original AC Ace is a legendary car. Introduced in 1953 with a six-cylinder engine, the Ace would later have a V8 stuffed underhood by an ambitious American and he would call it the “Cobra.” AC loitered around for decades, producing low-volume cars here and there (they still build versions of the Cobra) and in 1993, they revived the name “Ace.”

For the 1998 sales year, AC introduced a second-generation Ace Brooklands. They had just come under South African ownership and much of the car was built in South Africa before being sent back to the U.K. for final assembly. Only about 12 were built before production ran out in 2000.

But parts were still available after that and a handful of cars were assembled using factory spares. This is one of those cars (and it’s referred to as a “Series 3”). It uses a mixture of carbon fiber and aluminium for the body panels and has a 5.0-liter Ford V8 under the hood. Horsepower is around 260. It has 1,100 miles on the odometer and it is rumored that this is the last Ace Brooklands constructed. It can be yours for between $18,000-$22,500. Click here for more info and here for the rest of H&H’s auction lineup.

Update: Sold $19,342.

A One-of-a-Kind Pagani Zonda

2003 Pagani Zonda C12 7.3 S/F

Offered by Bonhams | Brooklands, U.K. | December 3, 2012

The Pagani Zonda began like so many ill-fated attempts at supercar production – as a dream and sketch by its designer, Horacio Pagani. The company was founded seven years prior to production beginning. But that time wasn’t wasted and Pagani wasn’t just any junior high kid wanting to go fast. He was already rich and had a lot of techncial know-how, having worked at Lamborghini and owning his own composite research company that made him a lot of money. The Zonda is a legitimate supercar – and a legitimate car.

The Zonda was well-designed and it is supercar pretty and supercar fast. This one owner car was built in 2003 as a Zonda S 7.3, which used a 7.3-liter AMG-built V12 making 547 horsepower. It could do 208 mph and cost around $500,000. This was the bread and butter Zonda variant. However, in 2009 this car was involved in an accident and sent back to Pagani for repairs. While being repaired, it was also updated/upgraded to Zonda F specification (it is listed as a 2003/2010). Other limited-edition Zonda models were also in production and bits and pieces of some of them were included on this car, including pieces from the Zonda Cinque and Tricolore.

Power is now at 594 horsepower and the upgrades cost a whopping 77% of the original purchase price! It is truly a one-of-a-kind Zonda, a model that is now out of production. The pre-sale estimate is $800,000-$950,000. For more information and photos, click here. And for the rest of Bonham’s auction lineup, click here.

Update: Did not sell.

Mercury Marauder Convertible

2002 Mercury Marauder Concept Convertible

Offered by Auctions America | Auburn, Indiana | June 1-3, 2012

The Mercury Marauder (a hot-rod nameplate that traces its roots back to the early 1960s) was re-introduced in 2003 based on the Ford Panther platform – basically a re-worked Ford Crown Victoria/Mercury Grand Marquis. By re-worked, I mean it had a 4.6-liter DOHC V8 making 302 horsepower. By contrast, the standard Grand Marquis had a 239 horsepower 4.6-liter SOHC V8. Only 11,052 Marauders were produced between 2003 and 2004. It is a car I continue to lust after.

So what’s better than a big, black sleeper sedan? Not much, but I really dig this 2002 Marauder Concept Convertible built by Roush. The engine was supercharged to 335 horsepower, the roof was cut off and two doors removed. What an idea! Too bad Ford didn’t take the bait and build a run of them.

This is, presumably, one-of-one and had a build cost approaching half a million dollars. I don’t know what it will bring at auction, but it won’t be half a million dollars. A tenth of that would should be considered “well sold.” The car has 155 miles on it and is listed as “fully roadworthy” – which I’m sure it is. I’m also sure it would be a hoot to drive. It is also noted that this car is sold on bill of sale only. So it’s up to the buyer to get it registered.

To read the complete lot description and for more pictures, click here. For more from Auctions America’s Auburn Spring sale, click here.

Update: Sold $51,700.