Shelby Series II

2007 Shelby Series II Prototype

Offered by Mecum | Monterey, California | August 16-19, 2017

Photo – Mecum

Cars bearing Carroll Shelby’s name first appeared in 1962. It’s been more a less a steady stream of different cars since, from his long association with Ford, to his brief stint with Chrysler in the 80s. The thing almost all Shelby cars have in common is that they are hopped up versions of already existing vehicles, from the AC Ace to the Ford Mustang to the Dodge Omni.

But in 1998 Shelby American introduced a car called the Series 1. It was a clean-sheet design and the company built 249 of them in 1999, all fully road legal and ready to go. While the cars were being built, however, Shelby American was acquired by another company (they got everything, including the Series 1, except for the Cobra “continuation” business). When that company went bankrupt on an unrelated matter, Carroll Shelby bought the Series 1 rights back. He built a handful of additional Series 1 cars in 2005.

In 2006, Shelby found some new backers who wanted to put the Series 1 back into production. The car was slightly restyled and rechristened the Series II. Three Series II Prototypes were built, with this being the only one in black (they were largely based on some of the leftover Series 1 cars that Shelby built, as this car was actually constructed in 2005). It is powered by a supercharged 4.0-liter Oldsmobile Aurora V-8 making 550 horsepower. If it sounds weird that you’d built a raw American sports car powered by an engine from an Oldsmobile sedan, remember they used that V-8 in IndyCar, too. $225,000 was to be the going rate, but some federal emissions laws changed and the project was cancelled.

This pristine example has only 22 miles on it. Shelby cars are still super collectible, so if you want one of the newest – and rarest – look no further. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum in Monterey.

S/N # CSX5505

Update: Not sold, high bid of $400,000.

Clenet Series II

1981 Clenet Series II

Offered by Auctions America | Santa Monica, California | June 25-26, 2016

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

In the 1970s and 80s, neo-classics became somewhat popular in the U.S. with their retro styling and modern drivetrains. This trend was exemplified by cars like the Zimmer Golden Spirit, the Tiffany, and even the rebirth of Stutz. And Alain Clenet’s Clenet Coachworks of Goleta, California, was right there in the mix.

Most neo-classics were based around other cars. For example, this one features a Ford V-8 engine. It’s a two-door convertible that seats four and has a lot of tiny, unnecessary details like etched glass and Waterford crystal ashtrays. When new, these cars cost approximately $75,000 and they make great daily drivers if your commute includes a parade route.

This car is all-original and is one of 187 Series II Clenets. The Series II (there were four total) isn’t the best-looking of the bunch (the Series I and IV are both more attractive), but it was the most-produced. This one should bring between $15,000-$20,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $28,000.

Bristol 411

1971 Bristol 411 Series II Coupe

Offered by Bonhams | Oxford, U.K. | December 7, 2014

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Bristol Cars has been around since the end of World War II, a spin-off of the Bristol Aeroplane Company. They’ve built low-volume luxury sports sedans and coupes for over 60 years. They went bankrupt in 2011, but were purchased and are back in business.

The 411 was the successor to the 410 and was built in small amounts between 1969 and 1974 in 5 Series. Series II cars differed from Series I in that they had a self-leveling suspension. The engine was a 6.3-liter V-8 but the owner of this car had it replaced with a Chrysler 7.2-liter V-8, fitted by the factory. It makes 325 horsepower.

This car has been owned by a Bristol Owners Club member for 20 years. The engine was rebuilt in his care and the paint is a little over a year old. Bristols have always been handbuilt cars and they only made 287 of the 411 across all series. This one should sell for between $63,000-$71,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Withdrawn.

Saoutchik-bodied Pegaso

1954 Pegaso Z-102 Series II Cabriolet by Saoutchik

Offered by RM Auctions | Amelia Island, Florida | March 9, 2013

1954 Pegaso Z-102 Series II Cabriolet by Saoutchik

Wow. Pegaso, the Spanish truck manufacturer, produced a line of sports cars in the 1950s and, boy, are they lookers. They are also highly desirable. The best-looking (and meanest) versions of the Z-102 I’ve ever seen have all been bodied by Saoutchik. This Cabriolet tops them all for beauty.

The Pegaso Z-102 was introduced in 1951 and lasted through 1958. Only 84 were built. This uses a 2.8-liter V-8 making 165 horsepower (other cars have other engines). Pegaso went the interesting pre-war route of offering different engine combinations with their chassis’ and then sent the cars to coachbuilders for interesting – sometimes one-off – bodies.

Saoutchik bodied some of the most flamboyant cars of the 1930s and 40s. When the last of the great coachbuilt cars (Talbot-Lago) stopped production, the great coachbuilders that were still around really didn’t have a lot going on. Some of them bodied a few Pegasos – Saoutchik bodied 18 Z-102s. Only one is a Series II Cabriolet (there were three Series I Cabriolets) and this is it. This car spent most of its life in its home country of Spain. At some point, an owner but a coupe body on it but it has been restored to original condition. It’s gorgeous and extremely rare – the most sought after post-WWII Spanish automobile ever built. It should sell for between $1,250,000-$1,750,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Did not sell.

Sunbeam Tiger

1966 Sunbeam Tiger Mark II

Offered by Mecum Auctions | Kansas City, Missouri | December 8, 2012

The Shelby Cobra was more than just a badass sports car – it was an inspiration and a new way of thinking in the automotive world. A completely redesigned Sunbeam Alpine appeared in 1959. It was supposed to be a sports car. But by 1963, the most powerful engine available was an 80 horsepower straight four. Meanwhile, Carroll Shelby had transformed the 120-horsepower AC Ace into his famous fire-breathing 271 horsepower monster – and that was just the start, as later cars would have 425 horsepower. The Alpine didn’t compete with the Ace in terms of performance, much less the Cobra.

Ian Garrad, West Coast Sales Manager for the American arm of the Rootes Group and a few other employees realized the Alpine’s potential and figured out that Ford’s Windsor V8 would fit in the car. They sent an Alpine to Shelby and had him wedge one of the engines in. Then they shipped it to England to have the Sunbeam folks evaluate the car.

Sunbeam approved and tasked sports car maker Jensen with the production of the Tiger. Series I cars used the 164 horsepower 4.3-liter V8. Series II cars had a 200 horsepower 289 Ford V8 (4.7-liters). This is a Series II car and they are very rare – only 536 of the 7,085 Sunbeam Tigers built were 200 horsepower Series II cars. While it doesn’t compete with the Cobra in terms of power or performance, this is still a fast, powerful British sports car from the 1960s. And there is that always-desirably Shelby connection.

This being a Series II car ups its value to a fair degree. To read more and for more pictures, click here. And for more from Mecum in Kansas City, click here.

Update: Not sold.