1924 Pierce-Arrow Touring

1924 Pierce-Arrow Model 33 Seven-Passenger Touring

Offered by Bonhams | Greenwich, Connecticut | June 4, 2017

Photo – Bonhams

Pierce-Arrow cars are instantly recognizable by their headlights that are built in to the front fenders. It’s a styling trademark that would define their cars beginning around 1914 and lasting through the company’s demise in 1938.

The Model 33 was introduced in 1922 and was produced through 1926. It was the first Pierce-Arrow with left hand drive. From its introduction it was the firm’s only model (until it was joined by the shorter wheelbase Model 80 in 1925). Power is provided by a 38 horsepower 6.8-liter straight-six.

The Seven-Passenger Touring body is very nice, especially in this color scheme. This car was saved from the wrecking yard by a famous old car hoarder of the 1930s. The restoration is older, but that just means you can drive it without fear of a few paint chips from errant pebbles. It’s a usable historic car from one of America’s greatest marques and it should bring between $70,000-$80,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Somehow not sold at no reserve.

1916 Winton Touring

1916 Winton Six-33 Seven-Passenger Touring

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Hershey, Pennsylvania | October 9, 2015

Photo - RM Sotheby's

Photo – RM Sotheby’s

Alexander Winton should be one of everyone’s automotive heroes – he’s definitely one of ours. Winton cars were always reliable, attractive, and well-built. The cars deserved to be around a lot longer than 1924, but the marque lived on in one form or another as a producer of engines until the 1960s.

The six-cylinder Winton Model 33 was built between 1916 and 1919. It uses a 5.7-liter straight-six making almost 34 horsepower. Body style could be had just about any way you wanted it and this seven-passenger touring was the largest of the four touring styles offered. It’s great and should bring between $75,000-$100,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $74,250.

All-Original Rainier

1908 Rainier Model D 45/50HP Seven-Passenger Touring

Offered by  Bonhams | Philadelphia, Pennsylvania | October 5, 2015

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Do you find this car to be in terrible shape or in great shape? I guess that’s a matter of perspective. It’s almost 110 years old and although it doesn’t currently run or drive, getting it to that point would win you awards in any preservation class anywhere. Rainier (originally of Flushing, New York, later of Saginaw, Michigan) built cars from 1905 through 1911. It was short-lived, for sure, but the cars were big – and powerful.

The engine in the 1908 and 1909 Model D is a 6.8-liter straight-four making 45/50 horsepower. John T. Rainier’s company was swallowed by General Motors in 1911 but they quickly phased it out in favor of Marquette. This is the only surviving Rainier Model D and it should bring between $250,000-$350,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $253,000.

1907 Stearns Touring

1907 Stearns 60HP Seven-Passenger Touring

Offered by Bonhams | Philadelphia, Pennsylvania | October 5, 2015

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

We will be featuring a Stearns-Knight in a few days. Stearns-Knight is the company that Stearns became in 1912. Stearns started building cars back in 1901 when company founder Frank Stearns wanted to build the best cars in the world. He did it: Stearns cars were big from the get-go and this car is no exception.

This 1907 Stearns is powered by a 8.7-liter straight-six making 60 horsepower. It’s a big car – really big – but it’s perfectly proportioned. It was restored a while ago but looks great. It’s an ex-Harrah car and should sell for between $650,000-$850,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold.