C.G. 1300

1973 C.G. 1300

Offered by Artcurial | Paris, France | June 17, 2019

Automobiles CG was founded in 1966 by Jean Gessalin and brothers Abel, Albert, and Louis Chappe. Their primary business was building bodies for other manufacturers, as well as assembling cars for other companies. But CG was also an automotive manufacturer in its own right until the company closed in 1974.

The 1300 was the final model introduced by the company, in 1972. Production lasted for about 18 months, and only 95 examples were churned out. CG cars were Simca-based, and this car is powered by a 1.3-liter inline-four from the Simca Rallye 2. Output was 80 horsepower in base form, or 94 when equipped with optional go-fast bits, which I think this car has.

CG is not very well remembered today (and neither is Simca for that matter), especially when compared with its peers, like Alpine. Very rare, this car should bring between $56,000-$90,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $64,454.

Jaguar C-X75

2016 Jaguar C-X75

For sale at Kaaimans International | Tollerton, U.K.

Photo – Kaaimans International

Jaguar has a pretty good history with supercars. During the 1950s and 1960s, they were producing the fastest cars in the world. They did it again in the 1990s. In 2010, they partnered with the Williams F1 team to build this, the C-X75. The original concept car used four electric motors – one at each wheel – whose batteries were fed by two diesel-powered turbines.

Pretty wild stuff. The package itself is pretty exotic, with hints of the F-Type at the front end. It would’ve made for a great (traditional) hybrid supercar. They were going to build an electric version, but the economy sucked, so they didn’t.

But what they did do in 2013 before the production car’s hopes were dashed, was build a limited run of developmental prototypes. Five of them, supposedly. Here’s where it gets confusing. They built five of these development cars, right? Well, they also supplied seven of them to the makers of the James Bond film Spectre. One of those seven is said to also have been one of the five prototypes. So what are we at then, 12 cars?

The other non-prototype six were custom-built for the movie, some to be crashed, etc. They had space frame construction, spartan interiors, and were really meant just to be pretty from the outside. Both the prototypes and Bond cars were reportedly powered by turbocharged and supercharged 1.6-liter engines paired with two electric motors. That combination was good for 890 horsepower.

This car, however, has a plaque inside stating it is one of four stunt vehicles used in the movie. And the online listing states it has a 5.0-liter engine. So I really don’t know how to wrap this all up and make sense of it, other than to say it looks beautiful. If it runs and is street legal in Europe, I’m sure it’s grand (except for that workhorse concept car-like interior). At any rate, it will be too expensive for most, with the price being available upon request. Click here for more info.

Stutz Model G

1919 Stutz Model G Roadster

Offered by Bonhams | Greenwich, Connecticut | June 2, 2019

Photo – Bonhams

Between 1917 and 1922, Stutz offered a single model every year and they were all based on the same stuff: a 130-inch wheelbase and an 80 horsepower, 5.9-liter inline-four. But they all had different names.

For 1919, it was called the Model G. Four different bodies were offered. The two-passenger Roadster would’ve set you back $2,750 – the same price as a Bearcat from the same year. The only difference was that the Bearcat had 10 inches cut out of the wheelbase. They are in completely different arenas today, price-wise.

This example was modified to look like a Bearcat, though it most certainly isn’t one. It’s been in the same family since 1960 and should sell for between $60,000-$80,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $44,800.

The Oldest Porsche

1939 Porsche Type 64

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monterey, California | August 15-17, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Ferdinand Porsche’s fingerprints are all over the German automobile industry. He helped engineer the original VW Beetle in the 1930s as well as cars for Wanderer, Auto Union, and Zundapp. In 1937 he designed the Type 64 and it wore his name – and his alone – for the first time.

Three examples were built between 1939 and 1940 – all race cars. They have a speed record car kind of look to them and that’s because they were commissioned by the German government to compete in a race from Berlin to Rome. And partially to celebrate the launch of the Volkswagen.

They shared the VW Type 1’s running gear: a rear-mounted 32 horsepower flat-four. The body was construed by Reutter, who would go on to help build Porsche’s post-war 356. Only one example was built before the war began, and the German government took possession of that car.

The race being canceled due to hostilities didn’t deter Ferry Porsche from building two more cars, the third of which used the same chassis as the first, after it was damaged in an accident. The second car didn’t survive the war, supposedly thanks to some joy-riding American GIs, but that third car was retained by the Porsche family until 1949 when it was purchased by racing driver Otto Mathe, who kept the car until his death in 1995.

This car, which is nicely described in the catalog as the missing link between the VW Beetle and the Porsche 356, is the oldest Porsche automobile in existence and was the third car ever built by Porsche. With Porsches as hot as ever, it is likely to break the bank in Monterey. Stay tuned! Click here for more info and here for more from RM.

Dodge Brothers Touring

1918 Dodge Brothers Model 30 Five-Passenger Touring

Offered by Bonhams | Greenwich, Connecticut | June 2, 2019

Photo – Bonhams

John and Horace Dodge were very important figures in the rapid expansion of the US motorcar industry. They got their start supplying engines to Oldsmobile and then became Henry Ford’s secret weapon until they cashed out and opened their own operation in 1914.

The firm remained “Dodge Brothers” until 1930 when it was shortened to just Dodge. But by that point, both brothers had passed and the company was under the control of Chrysler. The 1918 Model 30 was powered by a 30 horsepower, 3.5-liter inline-four.

It was essentially aimed at the Model T but was more expensive (Bonhams’ catalog very factly states that they are “way cooler than the T”). These really are great cars and this example is one I would love to own. Dodge built 90,000 cars in 1917 across six body styles. This tourer should sell for between $10,000-$15,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Bonhams.

Update: Not sold.

Hupmobile Skylark

1941 Hupmobile Skylark

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Auburn, Indiana | May 29-June 1, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

A very small percentage of American automobile manufacturers made it to the outbreak of WWII. Two such struggling companies were Hupmobile and Graham-Paige. Hupmobile had acquired the rights to the “coffin-nose” Cord 810/812 design but didn’t have any money to start building them. So they teamed up with Graham-Paige and offered them a deal: build us a slightly-altered version of the Cord, and we’ll let you use the design too.

So that’s what happened. The Graham Hollywood and Hupmobile Skylark debuted in 1940. The Skylark received a 101 horsepower, 4.0-liter straight-six. Changes from the Cord included a shift to rear-wheel drive, conventional headlights, and a less coffin-like hood.

Production lasted into 1941, but production delays meant canceled orders. Only 319 examples of the Skylark were sold before the company went out of business. Graham had only slightly better luck. Very rare today, this is the ultimate iteration of Gordon Buehrig‘s design. It should sell for between $30,000-$35,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $15,400.

Arnolt-MG

1953 Arnolt-MG Coupe

Offered by Bonhams | Greenwich, Connecticut | June 2, 2019

Photo – Bonhams

Stanley Arnolt began importing cars into the US from Europe in the 1950s and was later a manufacturer in his own right, based out of Chicago. When he was on a business trip in 1952 he ran into the folks from Bertone at an auto show and struck up a deal.

The deal was that Bertone would design bodies for Arnolt to fit on the chassis of other European cars. The first collaboration was the Arnolt-MG, which was offered as a coupe and convertible. Power is from a 54 horsepower, 1.3-liter inline-four. The mechanicals and chassis were from an MG TD.

Only 65 coupes were built before MG moved on to the TF, leaving Arnolt to find a new base car, which he did from the likes of Bristol, Jaguar, and Aston Martin. This car has been restored and looks as if it came from an entirely different decade than the MG TD on which it is based. It should sell for between $75,000-$125,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $64,960.

1924 Haynes Touring

1924 Haynes Model 60 Touring

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Auburn, Indiana | May 29-June 1, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Haynes, which got its start as Haynes-Apperson, was actually around for quite a long time, considering their rarity today. Haynes-Apperson sold their first car in 1898 but parted ways in 1904. Haynes soldiered on alone for another 21 years until they went bankrupt in 1924 and were liquidated in 1925 – the same year company founder Elwood Haynes died.

The Model 60 five-passenger touring car was actually the most inexpensive car the company ever built. And look at it – it’s a big, imposing thing. Power is from a 50 horsepower straight-six. Five body styles were offered, and this one cost $1,295 when new. A 1925 Model T would’ve run you $290, for comparison.

This car is an AACA award-winner (1993) and exists as a rare example of one of America’s pioneering automobile marques. It should sell for between $25,000-$35,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $10,560.

Siata 1500 TS

1964 Siata 1500 TS

Offered by Aste Bolaffi | Milan, Italy | May 24, 2019

Photo – Aste Bolaffi

Siata was founded in 1926 and spent their first few decades tuning Fiats. Their first original model debuted in 1948, but it was still Fiat-based. That trend continued into the 1960s, when they introduced the 1500 TS.

Based on Fiat’s 1500, the TS was styled by Giovanni Michelotti and was powered by a Siata-tuned 1.5-liter inline-four producing 94 horsepower. They are attractive, small, and all but forgotten. This is probably the last Siata you would picture if trying to recall all of their models.

Very few were built – and some were even built by Neckar Automobile in Germany. Even fewer survive today. This one should bring between $28,000-$34,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $25,774.

Delahaye Sport Coupe

1948 Delahaye 135M Sport Coupe by Hebmuller

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Villa Erba, Italy | May 25, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Delahaye 135M was introduced in 1936 and featured a larger engine than earlier 135 and 138 models. It was popular enough that Delahaye continued to produce the model until they went out of business in 1954.

It was also a sporty car, powered by a 3.6-liter straight-six making 115 horsepower when equipped with three carburetors, as this one is. This example also has an interesting backstory: the body was originally constructed after the war as a replacement body for a pre-war 135 S Competition Court car.

In 2011, the body was removed from the competition chassis and put into storage, only to be restored in 2017 and fitted to a restored 1948 135M chassis. And there we have it. The styling is very unlike most other Delahayes and kind of appears to be somewhat German, which it is. Anyway, you can read more about it here and see more from this sale here.

Update: Sold $320,041.