Three Decades of American Wagons

Three Decades of American Wagons

Offered by Mecum | Las Vegas, Nevada | November 16-18, 2017


1948 Buick Super Estate Wagon

Photo – Mecum

The Buick Super was first introduced in 1940 and it only lasted a little over a year before the war broke out, though an upgraded 1942 model was brought to market. This model was built through 1948, which makes this car from the final year of manufacture for that series. The Super was Buick’s mid-level model for ’48 and four body styles were offered, with the Wagon you see here being the rarest.

The Model 59 was actually the “Estate Wagon” and it featured this beautiful woodwork from Ionia. It’s powered by a 5.2-liter V-8 making 115 horsepower. It’s a wonderful car sporting a 20+ year old restoration and a prime example of functional post-war Americana: a V-8 woody wagon. Only 2,018 of these were built. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $26,000.


1953 Chrysler New Yorker Town & Country

Photo – Mecum

The first two generations of the Chrysler Town & Country were woodies. The last year for those was 1950 and for the 1951 model year, the name was applied to Chrysler’s station wagons (and would continue on their wagons through 1988 before becoming a minivan in 1990).

Chrysler’s 1953 model offerings included the six-cylinder Windsor and the eight-cylinder New Yorker. This car is powered by the New Yorker’s 5.4-liter V-8 making 180 horsepower. Only 1,399 of these were built in 1953 and they cost $4,077 when new. Read more about this one here.

Update: Sold $48,000


1969 Dodge Coronet 500 Wagon

Photo – Mecum

This style of station wagon was really the last hurrah for the classic, huge American Family Truckster. In another decade or so minivans would be the vehicle of choice for families and behemoths like this were relegated to the scrap heap. Luckily, someone saved this big boxy family hauler.

Dodge’s 1969 four-door model lineup included the Coronet and the Polara/Monaco. Four-door Coronets were available in base Deluxe trim, mid-level 440 trim, or as a top-trim 500. This nine-passenger Coronet 500 Wagon was the best Coronet family carrier you could buy. It’s powered by a 6.3-liter V-8 making 300 horsepower. Only 991 of these were even sold in 1969, making this extremely rare today. The original base price was $3,392. You can read more about it here and see more from Mecum in Vegas here.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $13,000.

Galloway Wagon

1908 Galloway Dual Purpose Vehicle

Offered by Bonhams | Philadelphia, Pennsylvania | October 3, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

The Galloway was an American automobile built by the William Galloway Company of Waterloo, Iowa, between 1908 and 1911. The lone product of the company between 1908 and 1910 was this so-called Dual Purpose Vehicle, named because it was meant to “drive to church on Sunday and be put to work on Monday.”

Having been built in Iowa, the Highwheeler design was probably apt, as it could be used by country folk to get around on the rough, unpaved roads of the day. The engine is a 14 horsepower flat-twin and the tires are solid.

Costing $570 when new, this extremely rare example is expected to bring between $10,000-$20,000 at auction. This wagon is almost all-original (except for a very old repaint) and has been in the same ownership since the 1930s(!). It’s not running now but has in recent years and can probably be made streetable with relative ease. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $26,400.

Ferrari Daytona Wagon

1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake by Panther Westwinds

Offered by Gooding & Company | Pebble Beach, California | August 20-21, 2016

Photo - Gooding & Company

Photo – Gooding & Company

We’ll start by urging you to go to Gooding & Company’s website to check out more pictures of this awesome car. Sure, it’s a Ferrari Daytona, but it has been turned into a shooting brake – a two-door wagon. The rear section features a lot of glass, including a huge rear window and gullwing-hinged side glass that fold up. It’s astonishing.

As a 365 GTB/4 this car is powered by a 4.4-liter V-12 making 352 horsepower. The design was actually done by Luigi Chinetti Jr. for a customer at his dealership. The body was built by Panther Westwinds, a manufacturer of sports cars in their own right.

The first owner was a Floridian who surely enjoyed driving this mobile, black, glass greenhouse. It would have a few other American owners (and one Belgian). The current owner acquired the car in 2013 and had it completely restored. It has only covered 4,500 miles in its life, which is incredible. This unique one-off is expected to bring between $700,000-$1,000,000. Click here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

1950s Mercedes-Benz Station Wagon

1951 Mercedes-Benz 170 Da Kombi

Offered by Coys | Jüchen, Germany | August 6, 2016

Photo - Coys

Photo – Coys

The station wagon boomed in the 1950s – but not just in the United States. While Germany may have produced some wagons, they didn’t build a whole lot of them. Here’s some model history: the 170 DA was an evolution of the W136 Mercedes-Benz that was first introduced in 1935. Production stopped due to the war in 1942 with just over 75,000 built.

After the war ended, W136 production resumed in 1947, thanks to its pre-war popularity. There were two models, the 170 V and the 170 D and in 1950 both were upgraded to the 170 Va and 170 Da respectively – with the 170 Da being the car you see here. The engine is a 1.8-liter straight-four.

The 170 Da was produced between 1950 and 1952 and the Kombi wagon variant is quite rare. This example has been completely restored and looks like it belongs in a museum. It should bring between $66,000-$88,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Coys.

Update: Sold about $71,000.

Cretors Popcorn Wagon

1915 Cretors Model C Popcorn Wagon

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Hershey, Pennsylvania | October 9, 2015

Photo - RM Sotheby's

Photo – RM Sotheby’s

Charles Cretors invented the popcorn machine. His shop sold roasted peanuts but he wasn’t satisfied with the machine he had, so he built his own. His company started building horse-drawn popcorn wagons and for a brief time, actually offered motorized popcorn wagon trucks.

This truck features a Cretors chassis and a 4.0-liter Buda straight-four making 22.5 horsepower. The Harrah Collection acquired this example in 1963 and restored it to working perfection. It’s the ultimate toy/promotional vehicle/historical artifact. Only eight or nine of these were built and less than five survive. It’s really cool and will cost its new owner between $250,000-$325,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $231,000.

Aston Martin Sportsman

1996 Aston Martin V8 Sportsman Shooting Brake

Offered by Bonhams | Chantilly, France | September 5, 2015

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Aston Martin has a great history of wagons – err… Shooting Brakes. A lot of the cars built earlier in Aston’s history were aftermarket jobs by outside coachbuilders. Not this thing. It was converted by Aston Martin themselves.

This car started life as a 1996 V8 Coupe, which is what the Virage was called from 1996 through 2000. Only 101 V8 Coupes were built. And only two were turned into wagons. The V8 Coupe was powered by a 5.3-liter V-8 making 330 horsepower.

This is a two owner car from new, with the current owner having used the car for hunting. I would presume it is fox or quail hunting or something as nothing could be more European. This is the last (or at least, most recent) Aston Martin Shooting Brake and it’s really cool. It should bring between $380,000-$600,000. Click here for more info and here for more form this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Three Ford Concept Cars

Ford Motor Company Concept Cars

Offered by RM Auctions | Farmer’s Branch, Texas | November 15, 2014


 2005 Ford Sport Trac Adrenalin Concept

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

The Ford Explorer Sport Trac was a four-door pickup based on the Ford Explorer that was introduced for the 2001 model year. This running, driving concept car was introduced at the 2005 New York Auto Show. It is powered by a 300 horsepower, 4.6-liter V-8. That’s the same engine from the SVT Cobra of that year (SVT did this truck, too).

This sport truck was never produced as you see here, but this one-off concept went into this private collection in 2010. It can be yours for between $50,000-$80,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $173,250.


2005 Lincoln MKS Concept

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

For some reason, this car is called a “2005” when it was actually introduced at the 2006 North American International Auto Show in Detroit. This car was the vision for Lincoln of the future. It carried on from the earlier Lincoln Zephyr Concept from two years prior, but this car was much closer to the production MKS that went on sale for the 2009 model year.

This car does run and drive and is powered by a 315 horsepower 4.4-liter V-8. Production cars only have V-6s. You can have this design study for between $30,000-$50,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $27,500.


2000 Ford Focus Wagon Kona Concept

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

The Ford Focus went on sale in North America for the 1999 model year (1998 in Europe). To appeal to the active lifestyle types, Ford partnered with Kona U.S.A., manufacturer of mountain bikes, to produce Kona Editions Focuses in 2000. Focuses? Focii?

The engine is a 2.0-liter straight-four making 130 horsepower. Production cars had bike racks on the roof. This was the pre-production prototype used to introduce the limited-edition model. It was first shown at the 2000 Los Angeles Auto Show. Only 5,000 production versions were made. This one should cost between $10,000-$20,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $8,250.

Courier Roadster

1911 Courier 20 Commercial Wagon

Offered by Bonhams | Philadelphia, Pennsylvania | October 7, 2013

1911 Courier 20 Commercial Wagon

The auction catalog lists this car as a Courier Stoddard, but according to other sources, the cars were only called Courier – even though Courier was a subsidiary of Stoddard-Dayton (perhaps the “Stoddard is the model name, but it’s rather confusing so I omitted it from the title above). Courier was introduced in 1909 and lasted through 1912 (for the final year they were known as Courier-Clermont once they had been acquired by the U.S. Motor Company – which promptly failed).

This was a lower-priced car than the Stoddard-Dayton. They were targeted at Ford buyers who wanted more performance for a similar price. Performance was likely: this car is powered by a 22 horsepower 3.7-liter straight-four. They were also durable as Courier built their cars like a light truck but with roadster bodywork.

This particular car spent a long time in Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry. The workers there did a light restoration on it years ago, although the car was mostly original when it was performed. Everything is either correct or period-correct and in working order and it has been in a private collection since 2008. Courier was a very short-lived automobile, making this very rare. It should sell for between $30,000-$40,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Bonhams’ awesome Preserving the Automobile sale.

Update: Sold $20,900.

Allard Woodie Wagon

1954 Allard P2 Safari

Offered by H&H Auctions | Newbury, U.K. | December 5, 2012

Allard built some sporty cars back in the day – the J2 being fairly well known. But the company also built some more practical vehicles, like the one you see here. And they are much rarer. The P2 was available as a Monte Carlo Saloon or as the Safari Estate. Both were two-doors.

While 11 of the Saloons were built, only 10 Estates were made. This one has a 3.6-liter Ford V8 underhood making about 85 horsepower. It spent its first few years doing duty on a sheep farm – so you know the utility side of things is pretty good. The restoration was completed in 1992 and it has covered 22,000 miles since – a good number of those in classic car rallies and events. It’s even been invited to the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

This is a very rare car (with only 10 built, less are likely to have survived) and a very interesting one. The woodwork is exceptionally British – the rear tailgate is a three-piece setup that reminds you of opening a hand-made cabinet. A woodie wagon from the U.S. would be more about style and less about function. I like how this car blends both seamlessly. It is expected to sell for between $72,000-$88,000. For more information, click here. And for the rest of H&H’s lineup at Newbury Racecourse click here.

Update: Not sold.

1953 Monterey Woodie Wagon

1953 Mercury Monterey Station Wagon

Offered by RM Auctions | Grapevine, Texas | October 20, 2012

I think this woodie wagon is way cool. 1953 was the second year for the Mercury Monterey as a stand-alone model (it started as a trim line on the 1950 Mercury Eight). 1953 was the first year for the four-door wagon bodystyle.

Under the hood is a 125 horsepower 4.2-liter flathead V8. I really dig the styling – woodwork on a 1950s wagon is just a solid look. This car was utilitarian by design and by fate. What I mean is that it’s a four-door wagon – fit for a family. Two-door wagons (although this was not offered as such) have a high-survival rate do to their unique style and desirability. Only five Mercury Monterey (four-door) wagons are known to exist (it was the 14th built).

The interior of this car is amazing. It is black and turquoise. Well, instead of talking about it, here’s a picture, tell me this is a color combo that doesn’t blow you away:

Love it. This car is coming from the fairly large Charlie Thomas Collection – you can see the rest of the offerings here – and is expected to sell for between $70,000-$90,000. For more information, click here.

Update: Sold $44,000.