Morgan Aero SuperSports

2015 Morgan Aero SuperSports

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Paris, France | February 6, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Morgans are weird cars. They’ve been pretty much producing the same models for more than half a century, so when they introduce something brand new, it’s kind of a big deal. In 2000, they introduced the Aero 8, a convertible that had kind of retro looks but actually looked pretty fresh compared to their other models.

In 2008, the AeroMax was introduced and it was the coupe version of the Aero 8 – and it had a boattail rear end which made it look even better. Then, in 2009, came the Aero SuperSports – the Targa version. It was produced through 2015.

Power is from a 4.8-liter BMW V8 making 362 horsepower. These are light cars, which makes them rocketships when you get on it. This car is essentially brand new and looks great in Lapis Blue. Easily my favorite Morgan, it should bring between $170,000-$225,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Update: Sold, RM Sotheby’s Essen 2019, $99,853.

Morgan Plus 4 Plus

1964 Morgan Plus 4 Plus

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | London, U.K. | September 7, 2016

Photo - RM Sotheby's

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Morgan is a car company steeped in tradition – all their cars are assembled by hand and even today, in the 21st Century, they sell cars with an ash frame. Many of their cars sport styling that was introduced in the 1960s and they even sell a three-wheeler that’s just an updated version of a car that dates back 100 years.

So in 1963 when Morgan introduced the Plus 4 Plus at the Earls Court Motor Show, the technologically advanced car was met with a predictably cool reception and the company went back to focusing on their bread and butter. This car has a fiberglass body – a long way from ash frames. The striking closed coupe body has a greenhouse that is large enough for two human heads, but not much more. The engine is a 2.1-liter straight-four making 105 horsepower.

Restored in 2007, this example has spent most of its life on the West Coast of the U.S. and Canada where it had a string of only five owners. This is the fifth Plus 4 Plus built out of a production run of only 26 cars. It is among the rarest cars Morgan has ever built and one of the most instantly recognizable. It should bring between $156,000-$182,500. Click here for more info and here for the full RM Sotheby’s London catalogue.

Update: Sold $172,592.

Bonhams/H&H June 2013 Highlights

Bonhams’ Banbury Run sale was held last week and the top sale was this 1966 Aston Martin DB6 which sold for $208,817.

1966 Aston Martin DB6

Our feature cars both sold. The 1899 Columbia Motor Buggy sold for $17,966. The ex-works demonstrator Javan R1 sold for $17,068. Interesting cars included this 1949 Daimler DB18 Drophead Coupe with coachwork by Barker. It sold for $34,136.

1949 Daimler DB18 Drophead Coupe by Barker

Other cool cars included this 1929 Morgan Anzani Aero – a fairly early Morgan three-wheeler. It sold for $44,916.

1929 Morgan Anzani Aero

And finally, this 1981 Talbot Sunbeam-Lotus “Rally Car.” These are moderately cool cars (the early-80s weren’t exactly “cool car” times) and this one sold for $17,966. Click here for full results.

1981 Talbot Sunbeam-Lotus

Next up was H&H Auctions’ sale held at Rockingham Castle in the U.K. Our featured AC Ace Brooklands sold for $19,342. Top sale was this 1937 Bentley 4.25-Litre Vanden Plas Coupe which brought $226,834.

1937 Bentley 4.25-Litre Vanden Plas Coupe

Interesting sales were definitely led by this 1918 Le Zebre Sports. I don’t remember coming across it when I looked for cars to feature, otherwise I surely would have. It sold for $123,088.

1918 Le Zebre Sports

Other cars included this pretty 1926 Buick Standard Six Tourer (first below) which sold for $18,024 and the 1920 Sunbeam 16hp Tourer (second below) which went for $58,027. Check out complete results here.

1926 Buick Standard Six Tourer

1920 Sunbeam 16hp Tourer

Bonhams’ Scottsdale Highlights 2013

Bonham’s sale in Scottsdale, Arizona was two days ago (look at this turnaround time!). They were also super-quick in posting their results (thank you). Top sale went to this 1972 Lamborghini Miura SV for $1,215,000.

1972 Lamborghini Miura SV

The top sale would have been our featured Mercedes-Benz 540K Cabriolet A, but it failed to sell (actually it sold late, or Bonhams didn’t publish the result at the same time they published the rest of them: it sold for $1,312,500). As did our featured Minerva Convertible Sedan. Another interesting car at this sale was the how-did-I-fail-to-feature-it 1964 Morgan +4+. It’s not a Morgan Plus Four, but a “Plus Four Plus.” These are extremely rare – only 26 were made. This one sold for $230,500.

Two of feature cars did sell. The 1928 Stearns-Knight Roadster sold for $126,000. And the one-off Ferrari 365 GTC Speciale doubled the lower end of its estimate and sold for $885,000 with buyer’s premium. Another interesting car was this 1930 Bugatti Type 46 Faux Cabriolet by Veth & Zoon (one of the more fun among coachbuilder names). It sold for a serious $951,000.

Click here for complete results.

August Auction Catch-Up

There were quite a number of high-profile sales during August during Pebble Beach and whatnot. I think it’s important not to overlook any other sales that went down around the time that more or less got lost in the shuffle. Yeah, they were much smaller in nature, but here’s a rundown of three from our calendar. First, the most recent, H&H’s sale at Stoneleigh Park on August 28th didn’t yield any significant highlights, but you can check out full results here. H&H’s August 8th sale at Donnington Priory had a few highlights, among them, the top sale, $258,000 for a 1967 Aston Martin DB6.

1967 Aston Martin DB6

The other sale we are looking at is Silverstone’s August 25-26 “CarFest South/Pride & Joy” sale. Among the highlights was this 1976 Alpine A310 for $23,470.

Then there was this 1969 Lancia Fulvia Zagato for $18,800.

A couple of older cars included, from H&H, this 1949 Riley RMC 2.5-Litre Drophead Coupe, one of only 507 produced. It needs a little work but still managed $25,500.

1949 Riley RMC 2.5-Litre

And from Silverstone, this 1938 Morgan 4/4 looks awfully good but it is consigned as “may need some mechanical freshening.” It sold for $28,500.

1938 Morgan 4/4

The final car from H&H’s sale was this 1982/97 Mark Phillips Cobra. I think I might try and squeeze in every obscure Cobra replica marque that I can when I do an auction recap. This one brought $23,300.

1982/97 Mark Phillips Cobra Replica

Some newer cars, from the Silverstone sale, included the top seller, a 2006 Ultima GTR (below) for $63,000. And then a 1994 Marcos Mantara 400 (second below) for $16,700.

And finally, one of my all time favorites, a 1972 Alfa Romeo 2000 GTV. This one looks near-immaculate in red. The price of $24,700 doesn’t really scare me as much as my bank account hopes it would.

1972 Alfa Romeo 2000 GTV

For complete results from Silverstone, click here. And from H&H’s Donnington sale, here.

 

 

 

Darmont-Morgan

1921 Darmont-Morgan Three-Wheel Runabout

Offered by RM Auctions | Nysted, Denmark | August 12, 2012

I don’t think there is any way, without breaking my legs into smaller pieces, that I would be able to fit in this car – which is a shame because I think it is really cool. H.F.S. Morgan began marketing his three-wheelers in 1911 and within a few years he was exporting them to France where a few many handled the importing duties. There are a few names on the importers list – two of them being the brothers Darmont (Roger and Andre).

Three-wheeled Morgans became popular in motorsports for a few reasons. One, they were light, and their small v-twin motorcycle engines weren’t necessarily overworked trying to keep them moving. They began taking victories in Europe and after World War One, a Morgan Three-Wheeler scored an improbable victory at a race in France. Roger Darmont quickly entered an agreement with Morgan to build the cars in France, where their popularity had exploded. These were called Darmont-Morgans.

Built in a Parisian suburb, the cars were, initially, the same as those being built in Malvern Link, but over time they grew into their own and in the mid-1930s, Darmont introduced a four-wheeled car of his own design. The company closed at the outbreak of the Second World War.

This rare survivor is a fine example of an early Morgan but in even scarcer form – a Darmont. It’s also a great example of a cyclecar – a style very popular in 1920s France. This car looks like it’s probably been in a museum for quite a while – tended to as needed, but never restored. It’s really cool.

No estimates have been published yet for this sale, but for more information, click here. And for more from this incredible sale, click here.

Update: Sold $41,700.